Difference between revisions of "Battery/Monolith"

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===Monolith===
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[[File:2_monolith.png|thumb|right|400px|link=http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/7-cool-things-about-zero-electric-motorcycles|Monolith technical rendering published in 2016]]
 
[[File:2_monolith.png|thumb|right|400px|link=http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/7-cool-things-about-zero-electric-motorcycles|Monolith technical rendering published in 2016]]
 
The term "monolith" refers to Zero's standard [http://www.zeromotorcycles.com/technology/ Z-Force Power Pack] sealed battery assembly with specific, fixed dimensions and a single [[BMS]] with fixed communication and power interface.
 
The term "monolith" refers to Zero's standard [http://www.zeromotorcycles.com/technology/ Z-Force Power Pack] sealed battery assembly with specific, fixed dimensions and a single [[BMS]] with fixed communication and power interface.

Latest revision as of 21:40, 4 December 2019


Monolith technical rendering published in 2016

The term "monolith" refers to Zero's standard Z-Force Power Pack sealed battery assembly with specific, fixed dimensions and a single BMS with fixed communication and power interface.

A monolith is designed to package up to 4 parallel bricks, described as "4-brick" or "28s4p", referring to 4 parallel stacks of 28 cells in series.

The 4p arrangement is a "full" arrangement: the monolith is split into 4 equal quadrants each fitting a brick.
A "3-brick" arrangement was available for 2013-2016 S and DS bikes, leaving the forward upper quadrant empty (presumably filled with lightweight but load-absorbing material).
Interconnects
An interconnect wiring system electrically connects each cell across bricks that is in the same position in the series.
  • Interconnects minimize the complexity of cell balancing by ensuring that only 28 conductive connections are needed from the single BMS to keep cells balanced.
  • Interconnects also ensure that a set of 3 or 4 cells are electrically able to balance a certain amount of load, reducing stress from imbalanced load variations while running.
Interconnects do seem to embody some specialized emergency fuse safeguards.
Components and Weight
32 lb/brick ⨉ 4 brick = 128 lb
The 4-brick monolith weight of 140 lb implies 12 lb for the base plate, BMS, dog house with contactor, current sensor, fuse, and connectors.
Casing features
  • The front face has two holes for accessing the BMS indicators, I/O port, and reset buttons.
  • The front face is also removable for servicing the BMS; within, the interconnects to the cells are on the left edge (as seen while facing the battery from the front); on the top edge are connections to CANBus communications and the external power bus.
  • The trailing edge of the left side of the monolith casing features an arc cutout with two holes.
    This cutout accommodates/mounts a CHAdeMO or J1772 charging inlet.
  • The top rear module called the doghouse contains the contactor and sensors for operating the safety limits.